A ‘different’ kind of garden sale

Vegetables and herbs are combined with flowers and foliage in ready-to-display vessels

Campbell River Grandmothers to Grandmothers Carol Seeley

The Campbell River Grandmothers to Grandmothers (G2G) are hosting a unique garden experience that will brighten the day, as well as the patios and gardens, of those who attend.

On Saturday May 23 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., the Sybil Andrews Cottage in Willow Point is the site for a different kind of plant sale, combined with a sale of garden-themed crafts, and a refreshing, relaxing tea.

Different from most other plant sales, at this event, plants are already nestled into pleasing arrangements in baskets and colourful containers.

Vegetables and herbs are combined with flowers and foliage in ready-to-display vessels.

Varieties from tiny Forget-me-Nots to sturdy Rhododendrons are potted and ready for your yard or patio. (The usual small plastic pots with starter plants are also available for buyers to combine into their own creations.)

These arrangements have been thoughtfully created by knowledgeable local gardeners, Jane Toso, Carol Seeley, Robin Geary and Sally Wilson, all members of the local Grandmothers to Grandmothers group. Other members have created garden-themed crafts including scarves, purses, bags, aprons and microwave bowl potholders for the sale.

Darlene Hawes has coordinated the project.

To refresh shoppers on a busy Saturday,  tea with tasty home-baked treats is being offered in the Cottage garden, for the small price of a donation to the Grandmothers Campaign.

The Grandmothers Campaign  provides funding for grandmothers in Africa raising children orphaned by AIDS.

In the nine years since its inception, this arm of the Stephen Lewis Foundation has contributed over $22 million dollars to social programs and health services.

Of that, the grandmothers groups on Vancouver Island have so far raised $2.2 million, with over $61,00 of that coming from the Campbell River group.

The African grandmothers, whose own children have died of AIDS, have benefited from the support for the many needs of their growing grandchildren, from the basics of food and shelter, to the hope that comes from education and the love of a caring family member.