Students can enroll in four separate courses.

North Island College pilots TV and film crew training courses

NIC will collaborate with the Vancouver Island North Film Commission for the program

You might see some current North Island College students working on the set of Chesapeake Shores in a few years — or maybe another Vancouver Island-based TV show instead.

NIC will pilot a film and TV crew training program at its Campbell River and Port Alberni campuses this fall. The program, which NIC claims is the first of its kind in British Columbia, will include four separate training courses.

Students who enroll in the courses can learn how to set up lighting, configure camera equipment, build and design sets and work as a production assistant. NIC will collaborate with the Vancouver Island North Film Commission (INFilm) for the program.

“This opens up a whole new avenue to find work,” said INFilm commissioner Joan Miller. “We have so many productions that want to film here.”

With scenic backdrops and an overflow of film productions on the Lower Mainland, the film and television industry is growing on Vancouver Island. Twenty-four projects were filmed on the Island in 2015 alone, generating $18 million in direct spending.

While most Vancouver Island-based productions are filmed in and around Victoria, a more northern-based success is Hallmark Channel’s TV series Chesapeake Shores. Filmed in Qualicum, the show has helped turned the seaside community into “Qualiwood.”

But despite success with Chesapeake Shores, other productions have chosen not to film on Vancouver Island due to a shortage of locally trained crews. The Vancouver Island Film and Media commission even held a job fair in Esquimalt in January to try and help fill the need for local talent.

Miller says crew shortages have been “a barrier for years” for film and TV productions on Vancouver Island, due to increased costs of bringing crews from abroad.

The new film and TV crew program was made possible after NIC received $500,000 in funding from the B.C. provincial government.

The funding was announced last March.

“NIC is very pleased to be working with our regional film commissioner and industry to develop customized, applied short-term training aligned with film and television productions,” said Cheryl O’Connell, NIC’s dean of trades and technical programs. “The fact that these courses are being offered in response to industry demand is very significant to the region.”

The film and TV crew training courses are full-time and run for three or four weeks. They start in either October or November at the Campbell River and Port Alberni campuses. Courses cost $275 each.

Students who complete the courses will receive accreditation such as the Motion Picture Industry Orientation ticket.

Those interested in applying for a course in the program should do so before Sept. 15. Application packages can be requested by emailing filmtraining@nic.bc.ca.

Just Posted

16-year-old Campbell River athlete heading to Cairo for volleyball championship

Emoni Bush of Wei Wai Kum First Nation to compete with Youth National Team

Striking Western Forest Products workers could lose benefits in September

Union, forest company at odds over Vancouver Island benefit payments as strike enters third month

Exhibit showcases work of veteran taxidermist on Cortes Island

Dozens of mounted animals on display at Wild Cortes

Stranded hikers rescued by helicopter on Mt. Schoen

Campbell River Search and Rescue used hoist operation to rescue trio

Fire chief urges residents to check smoke detectors following structure fires in Campbell River

Smoke alarms failed in three incidents, including fire that destroyed second storey of home: Doherty

New police force in Surrey must avoid VPD, RCMP errors made in Pickton case: Oppal

Boots are scheduled to be on the ground by spring 2021

Conan turns to the Property Brothers for tips on buying Greenland

Jonathan Scott suggests removing glaciers and mountains to bring in ‘more natural light’

Forests minister visits B.C. town hit by multiple mill shutdowns

A third of Mackenzie turns out for rally, not much to cheer about

B.C. sockeye returns drop as official calls 2019 ‘extremely challenging’

Federal government says officials are seeing the same thing off Alaska and Washington state

B.C. music teacher accused of sexual misconduct involving girls

Police believe other victims could be out there after the arrest of Lamar Victor Alviar

B.C. family stranded in Croatia desperate to come home

Funds being raised to bring back mom and two children

$5-million lotto ticket sold in Nanaimo

Someone matched all six numbers in Wednesday’s 6/49 draw

Most Read