Two Campbell River executives reach global milestones

Leah Tremain and Rhonda Teramura attribute personal athletic success to work-life balance

Campbell River’s Leah Tremain now holds a world championship title in JiuJitsu.

Two Campbell River executives hit global milestones this summer.

Rhonda Teramura set a new female world record and Leah Tremain now holds a world championship title.

It proved to be a busy summer for these two Campbell River -based executives and athletes.

Teramura set the new world record with the fastest time running the West Coast Trail in 14:32 hours. She also hit a milestone running her first ultra marathon, the Fat Dog120, where she medaled and came in under 44 hours.

“I am so thankful for family and friends supporting me along this journey. It was truly a memorable experience,” Termura says.

Tremain came home from Las Vegas last week with a World Championship title – winning gold in her division at the World Master JiuJitsu championship held by the International Brazilian JiuJitsu Federation (IBJFF).

With her local gym, Pure Martial Arts, and the West Coast JiuJitsu team supporting her on the sidelines, Tremain came home with gold after defeating a police officer from Brazil. She won with a submission that forced her opponent to tap out.

“My mental game had to be strong,” Tremain says. “Knowing the woman is an officer and from the home country of the sport was enough to make me uneasy. I had to work hard to visualize success and not falter or doubt that vision.”

Tremain is the founder and CEO of Tremain Media, and Teramura is the company’s executive producer. It is Tremain Media’s modern work structure – a distributed company with democratic hours that allowed them success in both work and their sport, Tremain says.

Tremain trained daily for her fight, sometimes three times a day, while working at Tremain Media between training sessions and at night.

“JiuJitsu, although it is an individual sport, it does take a team in order to succeed. I worked with two JiuJitsu coaches here in Campbell River and on the mainland, and a life coach for my mental game. I worked with a physio therapist and of course I worked with my training partners. All of these team members were key,” Tremain says, just like in her business.

For Teramura, she also saw similarities between her work and sport.

“I love the flexibility of my job. It allows me space to train and do adventure runs, while enhancing the very skill which benefits my job – flexibility.  I manage many projects, and all of them require being open to alternative approaches – my sport and my profession go hand-in-hand really.”

For both Teramura and Tremain it is the flexibility, teamwork, grit and drive that their sport demands of them that also propels them in their work.

Or is it the tenets they hold dear in work that propels them in their sport?

Time will tell as these two executives set their next goals in both arenas.