Some troubling statistics from Prostate Cancer Canada.

Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

It is of vital importance to increase our collective understanding about a disease that, when detected early, is over 90 per cent treatable

Mayor Andy Adams has officially proclaimed September as Prostate Cancer Awareness Month in Campbell River in support of the one in eight Canadian men who will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime and their families.

Prostate Cancer Awareness Month is a time dedicated to public education regarding the most common cancer in men. Statistically comparable with breast cancer, it is of vital importance to increase our collective understanding about a disease that, when detected early, is over 90 per cent treatable. In 2015, an estimated 24,000 Canadian men were diagnosed, and this number is expected to double by 2030 due an aging population.

According to Prostate Cancer Canada, prostate cancer can be slow-growing and some men who develop prostate cancer may live many years without ever having the cancer detected, so it is important to get screened regularly so that if you do develop prostate cancer, the appropriate action can be taken.

While any man can develop prostate cancer, men at highest risk are:

Over 50: Age is the strongest risk factor for prostate cancer. Your risk increases starting at age 50, and most cases are diagnosed in men over age 65. Prostate Cancer Canada recommends that men in their 40s get a PSA test to establish their baseline. If you think you are at increased risk, talk to your doctor before age 40.

Have a family history of prostate cancer: Your risk is higher if a first-degree relative (father or brother) has had prostate cancer. Your risk increases with each additional first-degree relative who has the disease.

African or Caribbean: Prostate cancer is more common among men in these ethnic groups. (Men of Asian descent have lower risk.)

Overweight: Achieving and maintaining a healthy weight reduces your risk.

Do not have a healthy diet: Men who eat a low-fibre, high-fat diet are more likely to develop prostate cancer. Saturated fats may increase testosterone production and promote the growth of prostate cancer cells.

For more information, visit prostatecancer.ca